Melaleuca Wetlands

Ecosystem Description

Melaleuca quinquenervia (swamp paperbark) and/or Melaleuca cajuputi (cajuput) closed forest to shrubland on poorly drained alluvial plains. Lowlands of the very wet and wet rainfall zone, on poorly drained peaty humic gley soils where the water table is near or above the ground for most of the year.

Regional Ecosystem

7.3.5

Biodiversity status Endangered
Estimated regional extent Greater than 30% of the pre-clearing area remaining
Sheoak Ridge percentage Estimated <2% cover of property
Location 1-pocket within Northern Ecotone. 2- central beside Rainforest

Palustrine wetlands occur at two small locations on the property.  These localities have very poor drainage and from January to April the ground is submerged. This long period of water-logging means that only certain species of plants can grow here and thus water loving species of Melaleuca and sedges dominate. A few rainforest trees such as the leichhardt tree (Nauclea orientalis), and pink euodia (Melicope elleryana) are also found here but it is definitely the Melaleuca that dominate. What the wetlands lack in plant diversity they make up for in frog diversity. DSC06887

Management

As these Melaleuca dominated wetlands are only represented by two small patches (< 2%) on Sheoak Ridge we intend create a third by altering the drainage pattern in a small low lying area at the edge of the open woodland.  Currently only a small seasonal waterhole containing a few Melaleuca exists, however this does suggest that the conditions are suitable for expansion.newwetland

Fire:

Source: Queensland Government, DEHP, Fire Management Guidelines, Feb 2013

SEASON: Mid-late dry season (May-Sep).

INTENSITY: Low.

INTERVAL: Long fire intervals.

STRATEGY: Target pandanus islands.

ISSUES: Fire has a role in maintaining an ecotone between the regional ecosystem and adjacent ones.

Return to Ecosystems and Habitats

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A private nature reserve in North Queensland

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