Bloodwood Woodland

Ecosystem Description

Corymbia clarksoniana (Clarkson’s bloodwood) and/or Eucalyptus drepanophylla (ironbark) open forest to woodland. Metamorphics.
Regional Ecosystem 7.11.51
Biodiversity status Of Concern
Estimated regional extent Less than 30% of the pre-clearing area remaining
Sheoak Ridge Estimated 30% cover of property
Location Northern ridge and hill sides. Southern hill sides.

Open woodland of type 7.11.51 covers approximately 30% of Sheoak Ridge. It is the type of environment that is most typical of the generic “Australian Bush”. The dominant tree is Clarkson’s bloodwood (E. claksoniana) with two additional ironbark Eucalyptus species. Other trees such as casuarinas, melaleucas, and acasias  are also present in large numbers in certain areas.

woodland2
Typical Open Woodland along ridgetop

Along the northern ridge within this ecosystem grass trees, (Xanthorrhoea johnsonii) grow amongst low outcrops of metamorphic rock.

Management:

 

Fire:

Source: Queensland Government, DEHP, Fire Management Guidelines, Feb 2013

SEASON: Cool, dry season (June-Sep). INTENSITY: Low to moderate.

INTERVAL: 2-5 years. STRATEGY: Mosaic burn < 30%. Begin burning early in the fire season, with progressive patch fires burnt through the year. Stop burning when the network of fires and other breaks is sufficient to impede fire spread later in the year. Storm-burning may be used to add further diversity to the fire mosaic.

ISSUES: Ignition is most likely during hot, dry season (Oct – Jan). These fires are typically high intensity fires that can be difficult to control. Maintaining a fire mosaic will ensure protection of animal habitats and mitigate against wildfires. Fire management approach may be different in areas west of Kuranda to Mt Molloy.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

A private nature reserve in North Queensland

%d bloggers like this: